Arizona Ear, Nose & Throat Physicians
Sun City West: (623) 975-1660
Sun City:  (623) 972-2951

By Arizona ENT
January 15, 2020
Category: Otolaryngology
Tags: tonsillitis  

When you or a family member presents with a respiratory infection it’s rather difficult to be able to tell which one it is. This is because many of them share similar symptoms. So how do you know whether you are dealing with tonsillitis, the influenza virus, or strep throat? Turning to an otolaryngologist can give you the answers and the relief you’re looking for.

What is tonsillitis?

The two lymph nodes located on both sides of the back of the throat are known as tonsils. They are the body’s first defense against preventing infection; however, even tonsils can become infected and when they do this is known as tonsillitis.

Tonsillitis can happen to anyone but is more common in children and teens. Tonsillitis is contagious, so it can easily spread if you come in contact with someone who is infected. There are three main types of tonsillitis: acute, chronic and recurrent. Most children will develop acute tonsillitis at least once during their lifetime.

What are the symptoms of tonsillitis?

Symptoms of tonsillitis may include:

  • A severe sore throat
  • Trouble or pain with swallowing
  • Hoarseness
  • Earaches
  • Headaches
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Persistent bad breath
  • Swollen, tender lymph nodes of the neck and jaw
  • Red, swollen tonsils
  • White or yellow spots on the tonsils

Symptoms of acute tonsillitis usually go away within 7-10 days; however, if symptoms keep coming back throughout the year then your child could very well be dealing with recurrent or chronic tonsillitis. It’s important that if symptoms of tonsillitis worsen or return that you see an ENT doctor.

Furthermore, it isn’t always easy to tell whether a sore throat is the result of a cold, tonsillitis or strep throat; however, sore throats caused by colds are usually mild and will get better within a couple of days. This type of sore throat will often be accompanied by other cold symptoms such as a runny nose.

If your sore throat is caused by tonsillitis or strep the pain will be severe and can make it difficult to swallow. Those with tonsillitis may experience pain located in the back of the throat, where the tonsils are located. In order to diagnose a strep throat your doctor will need to swab the back of the throat to look for bacteria.

How is tonsillitis treated?

Acute tonsillitis will go away on its own but rest and home care can go a long way to relieving symptoms; however, if tonsillitis is caused by a bacterial infection such as strep, your doctor will need to prescribe a round of antibiotics.

If your child is dealing with chronic or recurring tonsillitis then you may want to talk with your ear, nose and throat doctor about the benefits of having their tonsils removed (known as a tonsillectomy). This is a simple surgical procedure that can often be performed right in your otolaryngologist’s office.

If your child is dealing with severe throat pain and you’re worried that they could have tonsillitis then call your ENT specialist today for an immediate evaluation.

By Arizona ENT
December 13, 2019
Category: Otolaryngology

Just like breathing or blinking, swallowing is an involuntary habit that we don’t often think about; however, swallowing is an important part of everything from speaking and socializing to consuming delicious food. Unfortunately, there are disorders that can affect a person’s ability to swallow. A swallowing disorder can be uncomfortable and troublesome, and a visit to an otolaryngologist can give you the answers you’re looking for as to what’s going on.

Some people having pain when they swallow while others may have trouble swallowing certain foods or feel as if there is something stuck in their throat. As a result, they may have trouble getting the proper nutrients and calories they need. Swallowing disorders are more common as a person ages. Swallowing disorders usually fit into one of two categories: esophageal and oropharnygeal dysphagia.

Esophageal dysphagia

People who often feel like they have something in their throats are often dealing with esophageal dysphagia as a result of:

  • Gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD)
  • Esophageal spasms
  • Achalasia (esophageal sphincter dysfunction)
  • Scar tissue of the esophagus
  • Tumors
  • Certain medications that can cause dry mouth

Oropharnygeal dysphagia

There are certain conditions that can also affect how the muscles in the throat function, which makes it more difficult to swallow food properly. Common causes include neurological disorders, nerve damage (spinal cord or brain injuries) and cancers of the head, neck, and throat.

Along with trouble swallowing, those with swallowing disorders may also experience:

  • Coughing after swallowing
  • The sensation of food being stuck in the throat
  • Choking
  • Regurgitation
  • Sore throat
  • Hoarseness
  • Chest discomfort

If you experience persistent issues swallowing or if you also experience vomiting, regurgitation, or unexpected weight loss along with swallowing difficulties then it’s time to see an otolaryngologist.

Diagnosing Swallowing Disorders

To determine the cause of a patient’s swallowing problems their ENT doctor will go through their medical history, ask questions about the symptoms they are experiencing and then perform a physical examination. Based on the patient’s answers, your doctor will then determine which testing is needed to make a diagnosis. Common diagnostic tests include:

  • Endoscopy
  • Esophageal muscle test (manometry)
  • CT scan
  • Dynamic swallowing study
  • Barium esophagram
  • 24-hour pH impedance (to evaluate acid reflux and regurgitation)

Treating Swallowing Disorders

As you can see from the list above, there are many conditions and causes that could result in swallowing disorders. Therefore, the treatment you receive will depend on the cause and severity of your symptoms. Your ENT specialist will work with you to create an individualized treatment plan to reduce symptoms. With chronic conditions, your doctor will find ways to help you manage the underlying condition to make swallowing easier.

By Arizona ENT
December 04, 2019
Category: Otolaryngology
Tags: Ear Cleaning   Earwax  

Contrary to what you might think, earwax is actually beneficial for protecting your ear from infection. It lubricates and keeps the ear canals clean of bacteria and dirt. Ears are typically self-cleaning, so you shouldn’t have to clean your ears regularly (and in some cases ever); however, sometimes your ears can use a little help. If you are dealing with an earwax blockage, or you are prone to blockages, you will most certainly want to turn to an otolaryngologist to find out the cause of these recurring blockages and ways to keep your ears clean.

Most people use cotton swabs when they clean their ears. The problem with this is that it often serves the opposite purpose, and just pushes the wax further into the ear canal. Using a cotton swab inside the ear can also lead to damage to the ear canal or eardrum. Again, if earwax buildup is a common problem for you this is something you should talk to your ENT doctor about. A simple rule to follow: Cotton swabs should be off limits for cleaning your ears.

Cleaning Your Ears at Home

If you are dealing with a blockage you may be able to remove the earwax yourself with these gentle measures. First, you will want to soften the wax. There are over-the-counter products with a special glycerin solution that can help to breakdown the wax. You can also choose to fill an eyedropper with baby oil or hydrogen peroxide and apply a couple of drops into the ear.

You will want to leave the oil in your ear for up to two days before squirting warm water into the ear canal using a rubber syringe. Again, this syringe can be found as part of an over-the-counter wax removal kit at your local drugstore. Once you have rinsed out the ear make sure to use a towel to dry the outer part of the ear only. If you are prone to ear infections you may want to use a blow dryer to gently dry the ear.

Earwax Impaction

Since everyone’s ears are shaped a little differently this means that the cleaning method that works well for one person might not work as well for another. If you have excess buildup of earwax you may notice:

  • Ear pain
  • Fullness or ringing in the ears
  • Muffled hearing
  • Dizziness

If you wear a hearing aid you may be prone to earwax buildup, so it’s important that you talk with your ENT doctor about ways to reduce your chances for developing impacted earwax. In some cases, doctors may recommend coming in every six months or once a year so they can remove excess earwax safely and effectively without causing damage to the ears.

By Arizona ENT
November 22, 2019
Category: Otolaryngology
Tags: nosebleeds  

Nosebleeds happen to most of us at some point during our lifetime. While it can be startling, nosebleeds are typically harmless and nothing to worry about. Of course, if you battle nosebleeds rather regularly you may be wondering what’s going on and whether you should turn to an otolaryngologist for an evaluation. Here’s what you should know about getting a nosebleed.

Common Causes of a Nosebleed

The blood vessels within our nose are very delicate, which means that they are prone to bursting and causing nosebleeds. Therefore, the two most common causes of nosebleeds are nose picking and dry air. Dry air can dry out the nasal passages, which leaves the area prone to infection and cracking.

Other causes include:

  • Repeated nose blowing
  • Allergies
  • Broken nose
  • Acute or chronic sinusitis (a sinus infection)
  • Common cold
  • Irritants
  • Certain allergy medications (these medications can dry out the nose)
  • Traumatic injury to the nose
  • Deviated septum
  • Bleeding disorders
  • High altitude
  • Excessive use of blood thinners or anti-inflammatory medications

There are two main types of nosebleeds: anterior and posterior. An anterior nosebleed is a bleed that originates in the septum of the nose (the wall that separates the two nasal passages). These nosebleeds are minor and can be treated with home care. If your child experiences nosebleeds an anterior nosebleed is usually the cause.

Posterior nosebleeds occur further back in the nose where the artery branches are located. This type of nosebleed is much heavier, occurs more often in adults and may require medical care. While rare, it is possible for a posterior nosebleed to be a sign of high blood pressure or a blood disorder (e.g. hemophilia).

When to See a Doctor

While most people will be able to treat a simple nosebleed on their own without having to seek medical care, it’s important to see a doctor right away if:

  • Your nosebleed is affecting your ability to breath
  • Bleeding lasts more than 20 minutes
  • Your nosebleed is the result of a traumatic injury or accident
  • There is a significant amount of blood

While it’s not considered an emergency situation, it is a good idea to talk with your ENT doctor if you or your child experiences nosebleeds often. During an evaluation an ear, nose and throat doctor can ask you questions about your symptoms, perform a quick examination of the nose and determine the underlying cause of your persistent nosebleeds.

If you are concerned about you or your child’s nosebleeds then it’s best to play it safe and to schedule an appointment with an otolaryngologist. Call our office today.

By Arizona ENT
November 15, 2019
Category: Otolaryngology
Tags: hearing aids  

If you are having hearing problems, you may be thinking about hearing aids. Choosing a hearing aid is an important decision, and one you shouldn’t make alone. Fortunately, your ear, nose, and throat doctor can help you choose the right hearing aid for you. Here at Arizona Ear, Nose & Throat, we offer a wide range of ENT services, including hearing aids. With two convenient office locations in Sun City and Sun City West, AZ, our team of ENTs is here to help you hear better—read on to learn more!

How do I know if I might need a hearing aid?

There are some definite signs and symptoms of hearing loss, which may indicate how you can benefit from a hearing aid. For instance, you should seek out your ENT specialist if sounds and speech are muffled, you have trouble picking words out of background noise, you need people to speak louder, you have problems hearing the consonants in words, or you find yourself avoiding social situations/conversations because of hearing problems.

During an appointment, your ENT specialist can do a hearing test to determine your level of hearing loss. This is an important step to begin the selection of the right hearing aid which will benefit you the most.

What are the different types of hearing aids?

There are several types of hearing aids, each with their own benefits:

  • A CIC hearing aid fits completely inside the ear canal and is the most discreet type of hearing aid; CIC hearing aids don’t have volume control or a directional microphone.
  • An ITE hearing aid fits in your ear and loops over the outer or lower part of the ear structure; ITE hearing aids are less discreet than CIC aids, but they do have volume control.
  • A BTE hearing aid fits behind your ear and hooks over the top of your ear; they connect to an inner earpiece and have superb sound quality.

What are cochlear implants?

Cochlear implants are an alternative to conventional hearing aids and are a great solution for severe hearing loss. They perform the functions of parts of your ear that aren’t working correctly.

Interested? Give us a call

To find out more about hearing aids, hearing tests, and our other ENT services, call the Sun City and Sun City West, AZ, offices of Arizona Ear, Nose & Throat today. For Sun City, dial (623) 972-2951, and for Sun City West, (623) 975-1660.





This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.

Contact Us

PLEASE CALL OUR MAIN PHONE NUMBER 623-975-1660 DURING REGULAR BUSINESS HOURS.

Sun City West Office

10503 W Thunderbird Blvd #104Sun City, AZ 85351
13949 W Meeker Blvd Ste CSun City West, AZ 85375-4424