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Posts for category: ENT Health

By Arizona ENT
February 14, 2019
Category: ENT Health
Tags: Thyroid Cancer  

What is Thyroid Cancer?

Thyroid cancer involves having cancerous cells and tissue where your thyroid gland is located. The thyroid is a gland at the base of your neck, right below your Adam’s apple. This gland produces important hormones to regulate your blood pressure, heart rate, weight, and your body temperature.

You may be at higher risk of thyroid cancer if you are a woman, have a family history of thyroid cancer, or have had high levels of exposure to radiation.

There are several types of thyroid cancer, including:

  • Papillary thyroid cancer, which is the most common type; it shows up in follicular cells which make and store the thyroid hormones. Papillary thyroid cancer is more common in people aged 30 to 50.
  • Follicular thyroid cancer, which also occurs in the follicular cells; this type of thyroid cancer typically happens to people over age 50.
  • Medullary thyroid cancer, which starts in the C cells; the cells that produce the hormone calcitonin; if calcitonin levels are elevated, it can indicate medullary thyroid cancer.
  • Anaplastic thyroid cancer, which is a rare, fast-growing form of thyroid cancer; this type of thyroid cancer typically affects people who are at least 60 years old.
  • Thyroid lymphoma, which is a rare type of thyroid cancer starting in the immune system cells; thyroid lymphoma typically happens to older adults.

Thyroid cancer often has mild or no symptoms, but there are a few recognizable signs and symptoms to pay attention to. According to the Mayo Clinic, some common signs and symptoms of thyroid cancer include:

  • Swollen lymph nodes in your neck
  • Pain in your neck or throat
  • Pain or difficulty swallowing
  • Chronically hoarse voice
  • A lump in your neck

Thyroid cancer treatment works best in the early stages of the disease. Your doctor may recommend these effective treatments for thyroid cancer:

  • Surgical procedures, to remove a portion or all of your thyroid gland and associated lymph nodes
  • Radioactive iodine therapy, to destroy remaining thyroid tissue to prevent the cancer from spreading
  • Thyroid hormone treatment, to replace missing thyroid hormone

Your thyroid performs an important function by producing hormones which are vital to the proper functioning of your body. You can help protect your thyroid by visiting your doctor regularly for a physical examination and lab testing if necessary.

By Arizona ENT
February 05, 2019
Category: ENT Health
Tags: Canker Sores  

A canker sore is a painful ulcer that often develops within the mouth or tongue, but can also be found within the throat or on the lips. Canker sores should not be confused with cold sores (fever blisters), which are the result of a virus. There are several factors that can lead to canker sores, from spicy foods and vitamin deficiencies to stress or certain disorders.

While canker sores are benign and don’t require treatment, most of the time people are looking for ways to reduce canker sore pain until the sore heals on its own. There are two types of canker sores: simple and complex. Simple canker sores only appear a few times a year, usually lasting up to one or two weeks. Complex canker sores, on the other hand, aren’t as common and appear more frequently.

What causes canker sores?

While experts still don’t know what causes canker sores, we do know that there are certain things that can trigger the development of a sore. This includes:

  • Spicy foods
  • Acidic foods (e.g. lemons; tomatoes)
  • Nutritional deficiencies (e.g. zinc; vitamin B-12)
  • Minor injuries to the mouth (e.g. biting your cheek)
  • Food sensitivities
  • Stress
  • Hormonal changes
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Poor or weak immune system
  • Celiac disease
  • HIV/AIDS

When should I see a doctor?

It might be time to consult an ENT doctor if you are noticing:

  • Sores that last several weeks
  • Recurrent outbreaks
  • Pain that isn’t responding to at-home care
  • Severe pain that affects eating
  • Extremely large sores
  • Sores accompanied by a high fever

What are some ways to treat canker sores?

Most of the time canker sores do not require any treatment; however, if you are dealing with extremely large, painful or numerous sores then you may need to seek care from an ENT physician. Since canker sores will heal on their own, your doctor’s goal will be to help manage your pain through common treatment options such as:

  • Topical medications: Over-the-counter or prescription medications can be used to numb the pain or even speed up the healing process.
  • Oral rinses: To reduce inflammation or to numb the pain a doctor may prescribe a special mouth rinse.
  • Oral medications: If canker sores aren’t responsive to other treatment options, oral medications may be recommended. Such options include steroids.
  • Supplements: If your canker sores are the result of a nutritional deficiency then a doctor may recommend taking certain vitamins or supplements such as folic acid, vitamin B-12 or zinc.

If you are dealing with painful canker sores that you can’t seem to get under control then it’s time to turn to an ear, nose & throat specialist who can provide you with the answers you’re looking for.

By Arizona ENT
January 07, 2019
Category: ENT Health
Tags: tonsillectomy  

What is a Tonsillectomy?


Need a tonsillectomy? Tonsillectomies have been practiced for over 2,000 years. A tonsillectomy is a surgical operation to remove the palatine tonsils. Tonsils are two glands located at the rear of the throat. Ear, Nose, and Throat Doctors, also known as an otolaryngologists, are highly experienced in tonsillectomies. Here's everything you need to know about tonsillectomies.

Why it's Done

A tonsillectomy is used to treat chronic or recurring tonsilitis, complications of enlarged tonsils, and bleeding of the tonsils. A tonsillectomy is also a treatment for sleep-disordered breathing and other rare diseases of the tonsils. The need for tonsillectomies are more common in kids than adults. However, people of any age can experience trouble with their tonsils and require a tonsillectomy.

The Procedure

Tonsillectomy is an operation in which both tonsils are removed from a recess in the side of the pharynx called the tonsillar fossa. Once the patient is asleep, the surgery begins. An instrument is used to hold the patient's mouth open. The tonsils are then cut away with a laser, scalpel, or a heated instrument. Once the tonsils are removed and the bleeding is controlled, the surgery is over. The procedure is performed under general anesthesia, which is usually completed in 20 to 30 minutes.

Complications

A tonsillectomy is a common procedure. However, like with other operations, there are some risks with this procedure. These can include bleeding, infection, swelling, prolonged pain, or a reaction to anesthetics. Be sure to discuss your concerns with your physician before the procedure. Anyone who is contemplating surgery must weigh the potential risks against the benefits of the surgery.

Recovery Process

Tonsillectomies are usually performed on an outpatient basis, which allows the patients to go home once they are awake from surgery. Recovery time for a tonsillectomy is usually at least 10 days to 2 weeks. You may experience some pain as as recover from a tonsillectomy. You might have a sore throat after the procedure. Pain relief medication can help you feel better during recovery. Many people are ready to go back to work or school within two weeks after a tonsillectomy.

Post-Op Instructions

An appointment for a checkup should be made two weeks after the procedure. The most important thing one can do after surgery to prevent dehydration is to drink plenty of fluids. Try to drink non-acidic drinks. Soft foods such as gelatin, puddings, and mashed foods are helpful to maintain adequate nutrition. Spicy, hot, and coarse foods should be avoided because they may scratch the throat and cause bleeding. Bed rest is important for several days after the procedure. Strenous activities should be avoided for two weeks after surgery.


You don't have to suffer anymore. If you think you may need a tonsillectomy, talk it over with a board certified ENT specialist. Find an ENT specialist in your area and schedule an appointment today. A tonsillectomy can ease your symptoms and help you get back to a happy and healthy life!

By Arizona ENT
December 14, 2018
Category: ENT Health
Tags: cancer  

Head and neck cancers aren’t as often talked about or publicized as much as other types of cancer, but it doesn’t make these any less serious. Regardless of whether a member of your family has been diagnosed with head and neck cancer or you are experiencing some worrisome symptoms of your own, it’s important that you have an ENT specialist on your side to provide you with the care you need.

Head and neck cancer is an umbrella term that encompasses five different kinds of cancers that affect the pharynx (throat), sinuses, larynx (voice box), mouth, and the salivary glands.

Oral Cancer

Cancer can develop anywhere on the lips or inside the mouth. You may notice a red or white patch, or a lump, in your mouth that doesn’t go away. You may notice facial swelling, particularly around the jaw. You may also have difficulty swallowing or chewing. While a dentist can often pinpoint these early warning signs during a routine dental exam, if they suspect that it might be cancerous they may also turn to an ENT doctor for further medical care.

Pharyngeal Cancer

The pharynx runs from your nose to the esophagus and cancer of the throat can cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, persistent or severe throat pain, ringing in the ears, or difficulty hearing.

Cancer of the Larynx

The voice box (this includes your vocal chords and a structure known as the epiglottis) can also develop cancer. Symptoms are similar to pharyngeal cancer, as you may experience difficulty or painful swallowing or ear pain. You may also notice changes to your voice include chronic hoarseness. It may also feel as if a lump is constantly in your throat.

Cancer of the Salivary Glands

The salivary glands, as you may have already guessed, are responsible for the production of saliva. These glands are found in the mouth close to the jawbone. Signs of salivary gland cancer include persistent or severe jawbone and facial pain, muscle numbness, or weakness in the face, as well as swelling near the jawbone.

Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer

It’s important to recognize that the symptoms of nasal cavity cancer are similar to a lot of other less serious condition; however, it’s important to seek medical attention from an ENT specialist if you notice these symptoms:

  • Chronic or recurring nosebleeds
  • Chronic or severe nasal blockages or sinus infections
  • Facial swelling, particularly around the nose and eyes
  • Headaches
  • Recurring pain in the upper teeth

Do you have questions about head and neck cancer? Are you experiencing any symptoms that give you pause? If so, this is the perfect time to turn to an otolaryngologist who can provide you with the diagnostic care and treatment you need.

By Arizona ENT
November 16, 2018
Category: ENT Health
Tags: Smoking   Damage  

Smoking can cause many problemsWhile there have been commercials and ads occurring for years that talk about the negative impact smoking has on your health, perhaps it’s been something that you haven’t really paid attention to; however, if you’ve been smoking for a while and you are looking for a reason to quit, let an otolaryngologist tell you the many long-term and potentially serious health problems smoking can cause.

Many of the chemicals found in cigarettes are harmful and several of them have even been linked to cancer; however, smoking is the most common preventable cause of death in the US, according to the CDC. So it’s important to quit smoking if you want to protect yourself from:

Every time you take a puff of a cigarette or consume a tobacco product you are exposing your lungs to poisonous chemicals that damage both the airways and the alveoli in your lungs. Along with the increased risk of infection, you are also putting yourself at an incredible risk for long-term or potentially serious lung problems such as:

  • Chronic bronchitis
  • Asthma
  • Pneumonia
  • COPD
  • Emphysema
  • Lung cancer

If you are someone who has asthma, tobacco may not only increase your chances of an asthma attack but it can also make asthma attacks worse.

Cardiovascular Issues

The nicotine found in tobacco products is known to restrict blood flow. Not only does this affect healing but also it can damage the walls of the blood vessels and raise your blood pressure. As a result, this can increase your chances of heart disease, heart attack or stroke. Of course, exposing others around you to smoke increases their risk of cardiovascular problems, as well.

Digestive Disorders

Besides the increased risk of throat, lung or esophageal cancer, smoking can also increase your chances of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, smoking affects insulin production, which can increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes.

Smoking and Other Health Problems

Smoking affects just about every system in your body, from your skin and eyes to your stomach and colon. Smoking also increases your risk of cancer-related death. By quitting smoking you could drastically cut your risk of cardiovascular problems in just one year. Your risk of stroke or developing cancer will also drop drastically the first few years after you quit.

If you are trying to quit smoking you don’t have to do it alone. Talk to an ENT doctor who can provide you with the recommendations you need to quit smoking for good. You deserve to lead a long, healthy life.



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