Arizona Ear, Nose & Throat Physicians
phone:  (623) 975-1660
fax:  (623) 584-4282

Posts for: November, 2021

By Arizona ENT
November 09, 2021
Category: ENT Care
Tags: tonsillectomy  
Recovering From Your TonsillectomyBefore you or your child undergoes a tonsillectomy, you want to make sure you are prepared for the recovery process. We completely understand! Nothing is more important than knowing what to expect before, during, and after any type of procedure so there are no surprises. While your ENT doctor will provide you with detailed instructions regarding the recovery process, you may have questions or concerns about what to expect once you come home.

The Recovery Process

It typically takes about two weeks for both children and adults to make a full recovery after a tonsillectomy. You may feel tired and easily fatigued for the first few days after surgery. Other symptoms such as ear and throat pain are common and can last up to two weeks. If you find that your symptoms are getting worse or aren’t improving after 4-5 days, you should speak with your ENT doctor.

Get Pain Under Control

Pain management is an important topic for our patients undergoing a tonsillectomy, as the pain that proceeds from this surgery can be pretty intense in the very beginning. Your ENT doctor will provide you with a strong pain reliever to help ease discomfort during the first few days. You may switch to ibuprofen if your pain is starting to lessen; however, it’s important to avoid aspirin for at least two weeks after your tonsillectomy.
 
Stay Hydrated

It is very important that you stay hydrated and drink a lot of fluids. A good rule of thumb is to consume one cup of water an hour. If your urine is pale in color, this is a sign that you are drinking enough water. While you can eat what you want after your surgery, you may not feel very hungry at first. Don’t worry, your appetite will return after a couple of days.

Your Diet Post-Tonsillectomy

Most people worry about what they can and can’t eat post-surgery but the answer is, anything you want. You can’t hurt your throat by eating certain foods; however, you may want to ease back into your diet by starting with soft foods such as yogurt, rice, mashed potatoes, and ice pops.

Give Yourself Time to Rest

Most people will feel too fatigued to go about their normal activities. Most children will return to school within a week and resume full activities within two weeks. Most adults can return to work within 10 days after a tonsillectomy. You will want to rest as much as possible and avoid most activities for at least the first 48 hours after your surgery.

If you have any concerns about your upcoming tonsillectomy, or you have questions about your at-home instructions after you return home, know that your ENT doctor is always here to provide you with the answers, care, and support you need. Don’t hesitate to call with any questions or concerns you might have while you heal from your tonsillectomy.

By Arizona ENT
November 09, 2021
Category: ENT Conditions
Tags: Cholesteatoma  
CholesteatomaCholesteatoma might sound like a scary illness, and although it is a serious condition, it is treatable by your local ENT. If you’re suffering from reoccurring ear problems, mention Cholesteatoma to your ENT at your next appointment. 

What is Cholesteatoma?

Cholesteatoma occurs when a large collection of skin cells occur deep within the ear. This growth of skin is where cholesteatoma gets its name, toma being the word for swelling or tumor. Fortunately, cholesteatoma presents as a non-cancerous cyst.

Cholesteatoma can be either genetic, known as congenital cholesteatoma, or develop later in life, known as acquired cholesteatoma. Both are caused by keratinizing cells in the temporal bone. Abnormal growths usually present in the middle ear behind the eardrum.

Signs and Symptoms

A cholesteatoma usually only affects one ear.
It can cause symptoms including:
  • Fluid drainage in the ear
  • Foul-smelling drainage
  • Feeling pressure or fullness in the ear
  • Hearing loss
  • Dizziness or vertigo
  • Pain
  • Numbness or weakness on one side of the face
Risk Factors

Developing congenital cholesteatoma is incredibly rare. However, it is possible to acquire it in adulthood.
Some of the risk factors of developing cholesteatoma include:
  • Re-occurring middle ear infections
  • Poor eustachian tube function
  • Genetics
  • Being of Caucasian descent (incidence is rarest in Indian Asians)
  • Being born with craniofacial syndromes such as cleft lip
How Is It Diagnosed?

A doctor will take a look inside your ear using an otoscope to determine if you have cholesteatoma. They can see the cholesteatoma, which often looks like a cyst made of skin cells or a mass of blood vessels.

If the cholesteatoma is too small to be detected, a CT scan may be ordered.

What are the Treatment Options?

Treatment for cholesteatoma often involves surgery for severe cases. However, if caught early, it can be treated through a round of antibiotics, ear drops, and cleaning your ear carefully.

The goal of the treatment is to reduce the chances of an infection occurring, reduce inflammation, and drain the ear of the cyst.

What If It Goes Untreated?

Surgery is perhaps the best way to treat cholesteatomas that won't go away, which is, unfortunately, quite common. Cholesteatomas tend to grow bigger and can eventually lead to:
  • Destruction of surrounding tissues and bones
  • Permanent facial nerve damage, including numbness
  • Severe infections such as meningitis (although rare)
  • Chronic ear infections
  • Swelling of the inner ear
Because of the severe side effects cholesteatoma might have, it's important for people to get checked out by a doctor should they have any symptoms or risk factors.

By Arizona ENT
November 09, 2021
Category: ENT Care
Tags: Earwax   Earwax Removal  
Earwax RemovalEarwax can be more than a nuisance for some. Earwax, if left to build up in the ear, can cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms of excessive earwax.

Signs and symptoms of earwax buildup can include:
  • muffled hearing
  • sudden or partial loss of hearing
  • earaches
  • dizziness
  • itchy ears
  • tinnitus, which is ringing in the ear that won't go away
  • feeling fullness in the ear
To help prevent the onset of these symptoms, earwax removals can be done either at a doctor's office or at home. Over-the-counter treatments for earwax removal can be done safely if no infection is present, or if a doctor has cleared you to do so.

Can You Use a Q-tip to Remove Earwax?

It's important to know how to remove earwax safely. Most people believe the only over-the-counter treatment for earwax removal is using a q-tip inside the ear canal.

However, using a q-tip within the ear is not a good way to remove earwax and can lead to injury or infection.

In fact, according to the Journal of Pediatrics and the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, between 1996 and 2010, there were over 263,000 children treated in the emergency room for cotton-tip applicator-related injuries.

Safest Methods for Removing Earwax at Home

If you're planning on removing earwax at home, purchasing an earwax removal kit from your local drug store can be a safe option.

Earwax removal kits have detailed instructions on how to use them, making it easy for adults to use on their children or on themselves. These kits already come equipped with a rubber bulb ear syringe and ear drops.

These kits work by softening the earwax within the ear canal by placing drops in your ear twice daily. Then, the bulb is used to irrigate out any remaining earwax.
It's important to use these products as directed, for instance, no more than twice daily for up to four times. It's also essential to check and see if the kit you're using has not been tampered with or previously opened.

Other Natural Methods

Natural oils, such as baby oil, olive oil, and mineral oil can also be used to soften earwax and in place of earwax kit drops. These oils are typically non-irritating to the ear. After placing a couple of drops in the affected ear, you can lie the ear facedown on a towel to catch all the draining earwax.

Other possible solutions that can help remove earwax include
  • saltwater
  • saline solution
  • hydrogen peroxide 
  • vinegar and rubbing alcohol mixture
It's important to note any foreign oils, mixtures, or solutions can cause infection, so get the OK from a doctor before using these over-the-counter earwax removal methods.



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13949 W Meeker Blvd Ste CSun City West, AZ 85375-4424