Arizona Ear, Nose & Throat Physicians
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Posts for category: ENT Conditions

By Arizona ENT
November 09, 2021
Category: ENT Conditions
Tags: Cholesteatoma  
CholesteatomaCholesteatoma might sound like a scary illness, and although it is a serious condition, it is treatable by your local ENT. If you’re suffering from reoccurring ear problems, mention Cholesteatoma to your ENT at your next appointment. 

What is Cholesteatoma?

Cholesteatoma occurs when a large collection of skin cells occur deep within the ear. This growth of skin is where cholesteatoma gets its name, toma being the word for swelling or tumor. Fortunately, cholesteatoma presents as a non-cancerous cyst.

Cholesteatoma can be either genetic, known as congenital cholesteatoma, or develop later in life, known as acquired cholesteatoma. Both are caused by keratinizing cells in the temporal bone. Abnormal growths usually present in the middle ear behind the eardrum.

Signs and Symptoms

A cholesteatoma usually only affects one ear.
It can cause symptoms including:
  • Fluid drainage in the ear
  • Foul-smelling drainage
  • Feeling pressure or fullness in the ear
  • Hearing loss
  • Dizziness or vertigo
  • Pain
  • Numbness or weakness on one side of the face
Risk Factors

Developing congenital cholesteatoma is incredibly rare. However, it is possible to acquire it in adulthood.
Some of the risk factors of developing cholesteatoma include:
  • Re-occurring middle ear infections
  • Poor eustachian tube function
  • Genetics
  • Being of Caucasian descent (incidence is rarest in Indian Asians)
  • Being born with craniofacial syndromes such as cleft lip
How Is It Diagnosed?

A doctor will take a look inside your ear using an otoscope to determine if you have cholesteatoma. They can see the cholesteatoma, which often looks like a cyst made of skin cells or a mass of blood vessels.

If the cholesteatoma is too small to be detected, a CT scan may be ordered.

What are the Treatment Options?

Treatment for cholesteatoma often involves surgery for severe cases. However, if caught early, it can be treated through a round of antibiotics, ear drops, and cleaning your ear carefully.

The goal of the treatment is to reduce the chances of an infection occurring, reduce inflammation, and drain the ear of the cyst.

What If It Goes Untreated?

Surgery is perhaps the best way to treat cholesteatomas that won't go away, which is, unfortunately, quite common. Cholesteatomas tend to grow bigger and can eventually lead to:
  • Destruction of surrounding tissues and bones
  • Permanent facial nerve damage, including numbness
  • Severe infections such as meningitis (although rare)
  • Chronic ear infections
  • Swelling of the inner ear
Because of the severe side effects cholesteatoma might have, it's important for people to get checked out by a doctor should they have any symptoms or risk factors.
By Arizona ENT
September 30, 2021
Category: ENT Conditions
Tags: Deviated Septum  
Deviated SeptumIf you’re having trouble breathing properly through your nose (or one nostril in particular) you may not be surprised to discover that you could have a deviated septum. A deviated septum occurs when the septum, the wall of cartilage that separates the two nasal passages, is crooked. This means that one nostril may be partially obstructed, which is why you have trouble breathing through your nose. Fortunately, an ENT doctor will be able to provide you with some relief.
 
Medications

While medication won’t treat the nasal deformity, if you are only dealing with mild symptoms then your ENT doctor may simply recommend taking medications to help better control the symptoms you are experiencing. Decongestants are one type of medication that can help reduce swelling within the nasal cavity, making it easier to breathe.

Another medication that is often prescribed is an antihistamine. This is more common if you are also dealing with allergy symptoms that impact your ability to breathe. Those patients exhibiting symptoms such as nasal congestion or a runny nose may benefit most from this type of medication.
Along with decongestants, a steroid nasal spray may also be used in conjunction with this treatment to reduce nasal inflammation to make breathing through your nose easier. This medication is typically only prescribed by your ENT doctor for a couple of weeks.
 
Surgery

If someone is dealing with a severely deviated septum that blocks or partially blocks a nostril, or if symptoms aren’t properly controlled with medication, then surgery may be the best option.

Surgery is the only way to actually repair a deviated septum. This procedure, known as a septoplasty, is performed by an ENT specialist who will make small incisions within the septum to reposition and realign the cartilage. In some instances, your ENT doctor will also instruct as to whether or not a rhinoplasty (“a nose job”) is needed to improve the overall shape and size of the nose after the deviated septum is repositioned.
 
As you can see, there are several ways in which to treat a deviated septum. If you are having difficulty breathing through your nose, know that an otolaryngologist can help you breathe easier.
By Arizona ENT
September 29, 2021
Category: ENT Conditions
Tags: Deviated Septum  

Most people have at least some level of deviation between their nostrils, although it's not enough to cause concern. Many may not even experience some of the more minor symptoms, and those that do could see relief with minimally invasive treatment. But it's those for whom the condition is severe that something more involved, such as surgery, may be recommended. Whatever the spectrum of your symptoms may be, if you think you are suffering from a deviated septum you can turn to your Sun City West, AZ, nose doctor for guidance, and treatment. Learn more by reaching out to your experts of Arizona Ear, Nose & Throat Physicians.

Deviated Septum

What we call the septum serves as a separation between the nostrils, to keep the flow of air even between them. For the majority of us, there is a degree of difference between the sizes of these passages. We may be simply born with a slightly deviated septum, but as it's sometimes the case, nose injuries can bring about the condition.

Signs and Symptoms

There are possible signs that you may be suffering from a deviated septum, such as a noticeable difference between both nostrils as you breathe. You may notice extra dryness on one side, which can also manifest in nosebleeds. Recurring sinus infections are also something to be on the lookout for, as these could be a sign of more severe complications.

Complications

If the above symptoms are affecting your everyday life then it's time to see your Sun City West, AZ, nose doctor for an evaluation. Chronic sinus infections, as well as nosebleeds, and facial pain, are all possible complications of a deviated septum.

Treatment

Your doctor can examine your air passages and determine the extent of deviation between your nostrils. Medication may be the first approach to help manage the symptoms, medication in the form of nasal sprays, decongestants, and antihistamines. But for severe cases of a deviated septum, your doctor may prescribe surgery to provide you with much-needed relief.

If you believe a deviated septum could be to blame for recurring sinus problems, then schedule a consultation today with the experts of Arizona Ear, Nose & Throat Physicians in Sun City West, AZ, by dialing (623) 975-1660.

By Arizona ENT
August 26, 2021
Category: ENT Conditions
Ear PainWhile getting to hop aboard an airplane can be exciting, especially if you are traveling somewhere fun and new, we also know that it’s all fun and games until someone develops ear pain. If you or your child is prone to airplane ear (also known as ear barotrauma), then you may be interested in turning to an ENT doctor for answers. Discover the reason for airplane ear, what makes someone prone to this problem, and ways to prevent it from happening.


What are the symptoms of airplane ear?

Anyone who has ever experienced this knows the symptoms. Most people experience mild to moderate ear pain, fullness, or muffled hearing while flying. Sometimes these symptoms can become severe, resulting in intense ear pressure, vertigo, ringing in the ears, and even significant (but temporary) hearing loss.


Why does airplane ear happen?

Since you are flying at high altitudes in an airplane, the pressure of the air versus the pressure of the middle ear don’t align, which impacts how the eardrum vibrates. Since air pressure changes rather quickly, particularly during takeoff and landing, this is often when people experience bouts of airplane ear. Some people may find that yawning helps open the eustachian tubes to equalize pressure in the ear to alleviate symptoms.

Of course, flying in an airplane isn’t the only time that you may experience this problem. If you are in the mountains, ride an elevator or go scuba diving, you may also notice that your ears get plugged up. This is usually a minor occurrence of ear barotrauma.

Some people may be more prone to airplane ear than others. Newborns and toddlers are at risk because they have smaller eustachian tubes. Other risk factors include ear or sinus infections, allergies, or having a cold.


Are there ways to improve airplane ear?

Fortunately, there are certain techniques and tricks to make dealing with airplane ear a little less painful. Most people have tried the Valsalva maneuver, in which you pinch your nose and keep your mouth closed and then gently blow through the nose. You may also chew gum or suck on a piece of candy. If you believe that your airplane ear is caused by allergies or sinus infections, try taking a decongestant or using a nasal spray before takeoff and landing.

If you find yourself dealing with ear pain or changes in hearing that last for days after flying, it’s important that you call your ENT doctor right away. Even the most minor symptoms may require medical attention, so don’t ignore them.

Scratchy Throat

Sore throats are one of the most common symptoms people experience; however, they often accompany bacterial throat infections and colds. If you find yourself waking up in the morning with a dry, scratchy, or sore throat, then you may be wondering what’s going on. An ENT doctor who specializes in treating conditions of the ear, nose, and throat may be able to give you the answers you’re looking for.
 
What could be causing this problem?

It’s important to look to your environment and your lifestyle for clues as to what’s going on. For one, if you were out singing or talking in a loud club the night before you may have simply strained your vocal cords. If you have seasonal allergies such as hay fever, you may notice that you wake up with persistent scratchy or sore throats several months out of the year. If your bedroom is particularly dry, especially during the colder months, this could be another reason you wake up with sore throats.

There are a host of infections that also cause sore throats; however, they are often short-lived and don’t persist for more than 10 days. Viral infections are often to blame, and they will go away without treatment (antibiotics will not be effective against the common cold or influenza virus). People who deal with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) often complain of a scratchy or sore throat. If you are also dealing with heartburn or acid reflux two or more times a week, this could be the culprit.
 
Another possible cause of a sore or scratchy throat in the morning is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a common sleep disorder that causes obstructions in the airway while you sleep. It’s important to recognize the warning signs of OSA so that you know when to turn to an ENT for further evaluation.
 
These signs include,
  • Waking up with a sore throat
  • Persistent morning headaches
  • Waking up tired despite a full night’s sleep
  • Loud, chronic snoring
  • Increased mood swings
  • Trouble concentrating and poor memory
When to see a doctor?

If you experience recurring or persistent sore throats it’s always a good idea to see your ENT doctor for a proper diagnosis so you know how to best treat your symptoms. Since some infections such as strep can be dangerous to both kids and adults, it’s important to know when to come in for treatment.
  • You should see an ENT doctor right away if:
  • You are having trouble swallowing or breathing
  • You have extremely painful or swollen lymph nodes
  • Your sore throat is accompanied by a high fever
  • Your sore throat persists for more than a week
  • You have trouble sleeping due to swallowing or breathing issues
If you are dealing with a persistent or recurring scratchy or sore throat it’s important that you consult an ENT doctor to find out what’s going on. Many of the conditions above warrant treatment to prevent further complications, so don’t delay getting the treatment you need.


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623-975-1660
13949 W Meeker Blvd Ste CSun City West, AZ 85375-4424